The warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature. Everybody's Reviewing: Review by Amirah Mohiddin of Warrior Women of Islam: Female Empowerment in Arabic Popular by Remke Kruk 2019-01-28

The warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature Rating: 6,8/10 577 reviews

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the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

The writing gives us an image of how current societal expectations of gender roles have severely turned back the clock, beyond even these medieval warriors. Kruk's book appears an essential addition to any reader interested in the diversity of the literary and popular culture in the Arabic language for the wealth of material it provides and so carefully examines. Lastly, how are these epics reflective of reality? Wildly appreciated by medieval audiences, and spread by professional storytellers throughout the cities of the Muslim world, these fictions were printed and reprinted over the centuries and comprise a vital part of Arab culture. Kruk expertly guides the reader through stories that should challenge common Western perceptions of the Middle Eastern woman, medieval or modern. After reading this book, I have the niggling suspicion that the Turkic epics may be outperformed in this area by their Arabic-language peers. Not only are the heroines Dhat al-himma, Qannasa and Ghamra born to be warriors, but they also earn it through their various military conquests, frequently beating male heroes on the battlefield.

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Remke Kruk

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

Their equivalents in the Arabic-writing world suffered a similar fate. But few people are aware of a much larger corpus of narrative texts known as popular epic. The Warrior Women of Islam unites these diverse women highlighting a controversial argument against the demure, passive and emasculated woman, turning them into an emancipated and empowered vision of the future. Colloquial Arabic storytelling is most commonly associated with the Arabian Nights. The Warrior Women of Islam puts a bold new complexion on gender roles and the wider perception of women in the Middle East. One monk wrote out Beowulf, probably under his desk. For example, these stories were told and written for males, how can this be seen through the narrative of the Arabian epic? For example, these stories were told and written for males; how can this be seen through the narrative of the Arabian epic? The E-mail message field is required.

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The Warrior Women of Islam : Remke Kruk : 9781848859272

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

Contents: Arabic popular epic : an introductory note -- Warrior women in the Arabic tradition -- Sirat Dhat al-Himma 1 : Princess Dhat al-Himma and her many battles -- Sirat Dhat al-Himma 2 : Prince 'Abd al-Wahhab and his warrior wives -- Sirat Dhat al-Himma 3 : The History of Ghamra the Daughter of 'Utarid -- Warrior women in Sirat 'Antara 1 : Ghamra the daughter of Fa'iz -- Warrior women in Sirat 'Antara 2 : Hayfa', Zarqa' and Unaytira -- Prince Hamza al-Bahlawan : In Praise of Traditional Womanhood -- Sirat Baybars 1 : Lionesses -- Sirat Baybars 2 : Warrior queens -- King Sayf ibn Dhi Yazan, the Soft-Hearted 1 : Qamariya -- King Sayf ibn Dhi Yazan 2 : Tama -- King Sayf ibn Dhi Yazan 3 : Munyat al-Nufus -- Final observations. Mbongeni Ngema and Percy Mtwa, together with their original crew, have regrouped to stage this world-class form of protest theatre once more, and they are headed to the South African State Theatre this March 2019. She recounts the story of Princess Dhat al-Himma, brave and undefeated leader of the Muslim army in its wars against the Byzantines; of Ghamra, brought up as a boy to become a fearless leader of men; and of cool-headed Qannasa, raiding from her mountain fortress to capture and seduce her enemies before putting them pitilessly to the sword. But few people are aware of a much larger corpus of narrative texts known as popular epic. Lastly, how are these epics reflective of reality? Also, why if Dhat al Himma and Ghamra were so proud of their femininity did they dress as men on the battlefield? Kruk's book appears an essential addition to any reader interested in the diversity of the literary and popular culture in the Arabic language for the wealth of material it provides and so carefully examines. Spontaneous generation abiogenesis was a widely accepted concept in Greek, medieval Islamic and pre-modern European thought. Kruk enquires and analyses the origins of these stories and opens up their more problematic aspects to the reader.

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A review of โ€œThe Warrior Women of Islam: Female Empowerment in Arabic Popular Literature by Remke Krukโ€ by Amirah Mohiddin

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

The stories that Kruk recounts describe women who are brave and respected leaders. In this book, Remke Kruk makes these neglected romances available to a Western audience, putting a bold new complexion on gender roles and the wider perception of women in the Middle East. Kruk's book appears an essential addition to any reader interested in the diversity of the literary and popular culture in the Arabic language for the wealth of material it provides and so carefully examines. Some of the heroes are female, in some cases black women. In particular there was a vogue for lengthy poetic epics featuring Arab paladins who battled against Byzantines, Crusaders and Zoroastrians โ€” not to mention sorcerers, dragons and seductresses.

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The Warrior Women of Islam: Female Empowerment in Arabic Popular Literature by Remke Kruk

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

Mbongeni Ngema and Percy Mtwa, together with their original crew, have regrouped to stage this world-class form of protest theatre once more, and they are headed to the South African State Theatre this March 2019. Some of the heroes are female, in some cases black women. Kruk deserves our thanks for making available to a general and even scholarly audience what is effectively a new literary territory for the West. In this book, Remke Kruk makes these neglected romances available to a Western audience, putting a bold new complexion on gender roles and the wider perception of women in the Middle East. Colloquial Arabic storytelling is most commonly associated with The Thousandvand One Nights. She recounts the story of Princess Dhat al-Himma, brave and undefeated leader of the Muslim army in its wars against the Byzantines; of Ghamra, brought up as a boy to become a fearless leader of men; and of Qannasa, an infidel, raiding from her mountain fortress to capture and seduce her enemies before putting them pitilessly to the sword.

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Remke Kruk

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

Remke Kruk at last makes these neglected romances available to a Western audience. Remke Kruk at last makes these neglected romances available to a Western audience. These heroic romantic tales, originating in the Middle Ages, form vast cycles of adventure stories whose most remarkable feature is their portrayal of powerful and memorable women. Either a victim of pieties, or if not, of snobbishness. Kruk's book appears an essential addition to any reader interested in the diversity of the literary and popular culture in the Arabic language for the wealth of material it provides and so carefully examines. There is also the more expensive in 3 vols, the 3rd vol being Texts, with extensive summary of the main epics.

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The Warrior Women of Islam : Remke Kruk : 9781848859272

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

Lastly, how are these epics reflective of reality? These heroic romantic tales, originating in the Middle Ages, form vast cycles of adventure stories whose most remarkable feature is their portrayal of powerful and memorable women. The tales center on the deeds of warriors endowed with implausible strength, endurance, and, often, nobility who fight with sword, shield, and lance, win cities and provinces for Islam, make daring escapes, and fall in love. Lastly, how are these epics reflective of reality? The Warrior Women of Islam puts a bold new complexion on gender roles and the wider perception of women in the Middle East. Wildly appreciated by medieval audiences, and spread by professional storytellers throughout the cities of the Muslim world, these fictions were printed and reprinted over the centuries and comprise a vital part of Arab culture. Or rather, if the word is permissible today, heroines. Yes, we know about the very popular One Thousand and One Nights rolls eyes , but how about a text focusing purely on gender issues.

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The Warrior Women of Islam : Remke Kruk : 9781848859272

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

Kruk expertly guides the reader through stories that should challenge common Western perceptions of the Middle Eastern woman, medieval or modern. Not only are the heroines Dhat al-himma, Qannasa and Ghamra born to be warriors, but they also earn it through their various military conquests, frequently beating male heroes on the battlefield. But few people are aware of a much larger corpus of narrative texts known as popular epic. But few people are aware of a much larger corpus of narrative texts known as popular epic. For example, these stories were told and written for males; how can this be seen through the narrative of the Arabian epic? Allen University of Wisconsin, Fox Valley.

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The Warrior Women of Islam: Female Empowerment in Arabic Popular Literature by Remke Kruk

the warrior women of islam female empowerment in arabic popular literature

The author's incisive analysis is unique in that it encompasses every major example of the genre and hence provides a panoramic view of the subject. But few people are aware of a much larger corpus of narrative texts known as popular epic. But since neither are extensively translated into English, alas, I am unequipped to adjudicate in this challenge. Allen, University of Wisconsin, Fox Valley This book was reviewed in the May 2014 issue of World Literature Today. Not only are the heroines Dhat al-himma, Qannasa and Ghamra born to be warriors, but they also earn it through their various military conquests, frequently beating male heroes on the battlefield. The book offers a fascinating and insightful investigation into the representation of women warriors as found in a major narrative genre of pre-modern Arabic literature, the popular epic. The Warrior Women of Islam unites these diverse women highlighting a controversial argument against the demure, passive and emasculated woman, turning them into an emancipated and empowered vision of the future.

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