Mapping the nation schulten susan. Mapping the Nation 2019-01-28

Mapping the nation schulten susan Rating: 8,6/10 1257 reviews

Book Release: Mapping the Nation

mapping the nation schulten susan

. The sectional crisis sparked tremendous creativity in mapmaking, as Northerners began to use maps to measure the extent of slavery. In Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten charts how maps of epidemic disease, slavery, census statistics, the environment, and the past demonstrated the analytical potential of cartography, and in the process transformed the very meaning of a map. In Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten charts how maps of epidemic disease, slavery, census statistics, the environment, and the past demonstrated the analytical potential of cartography, and in the process transformed the very meaning of a map. Most of the maps in this book are from the British Library collection - the richest storehouse of American mapping outside North America. As a Librarian I particularly like the additional website at.

Next

Susan Schulten. Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth

mapping the nation schulten susan

Selected details of maps from the blog are below: click on the title or image to see the entire map. This is a very good and very well researched introduction to the topic of 'thematic' maps and how they came to influence law, society and our nation's growing sense of self. Author Susan Schulten has done a fine job bringing into focus the interplay of personalities and publishing forces that brought this style of maps to the fore in the 19th century. She teaches courses on Lincoln, the Civil War and Reconstruction, America at the turn of the century, the history of American ideas and culture, the Great Depression, the Cold War, war and the presidency, and the methods and philosophy of history. We use maps on our smart phones to help us navigate from place to place.

Next

Book Release: Mapping the Nation

mapping the nation schulten susan

Here you can see how leaders experimented with cartography to measure the nation in new and unexpected ways, from the characteristics of its population to the distribution of its natural resources. Schulten draws on both official and ephemeral artefacts - maps of exploration, political conflict and territorial control as well as education, science and tourism. From statistical mapping to historical atlases, Americans confronted entirely new ways to think about cartography in the nineteenth century. ~Susan Schulten, Mapping the Nation, July 6, 2012, University of Chicago Press. Many of the maps in this volume have been deemed important for their role in exploration, statecraft, and diplomacy. As the book approaches publication, I am isolating particular techniques such as as seen in Transportation and Rates of Travel below, as seen in Map Showing the Distribution of the Slave Population of the Southern States below, and many, many more.

Next

Book Release: Mapping the Nation

mapping the nation schulten susan

I came away with materials and resources that I can immediately use in the classroom. Author Susan Schulten has done a fine job bringing into focus the interplay of personalities and publishing forces that brought this style of maps to the fore in the 19th century. Note the inclusion of failed voyages and settlements. Here we examine how old maps came to be considered valuable, which was related to the rising popularity of historical atlases and the campaign to create a national archive of maps at the Library of Congress. Maps in the newspaper and online show us the spread of disease, the state of the planet, and the conflicts among nations.

Next

Susan Schulten, “Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth

mapping the nation schulten susan

Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America by Susan Schulten, © 2012. Below is a map from the book depicting the Electoral College results from the very first presidential election of George Washington in 1789 through Rutherford B. By the early twentieth century, maps had become common tools of analysis, communication, and visual representation in an increasingly complex nation. The site serves as a collection of visualizations of global systems that range from watersheds and greenbelts to distribution chains and social networks. Professor Schulten has also created an excellent companion site for the book,. Their groundbreaking work was closely related to the race to map the environment in a nation that was rapidly expanding westward. Scientists and researchers began to use maps as tools to aid understanding of such topics as education, medicine, climatology, and social issues.

Next

Organization of American Historians: Susan Schulten

mapping the nation schulten susan

Federal agencies after the Civil War began to use mapping as a means to understand the economic, moral, ethnic, racial, and physical qualities of the post-war United States. She is also the author of Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America 2012 , which won the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association's Norris and Carol Hundley Award, and The Geographical Imagination in America, 1880—1950 2001. Her recent book is a fantastic resource for historic maps that gave rise to many visualization techniques still in use today. One of the first American attempts to translate the census into cartographic form, and a favorite of President Lincoln during the Civil War. Whether made for military strategy or urban reform, to encourage settlement or to investigate disease, maps have the power to illuminate and complicate our understanding of the past. Her newest book is A History of America in 100 Maps 2018 , published by the British Library Press and the University of Chicago Press. For the past two centuries, maps have been an important part of our history.

Next

Mapping the Nation by Susan Schulten (Making Maps: DIY Cartography)

mapping the nation schulten susan

By exploring both iconic as well as unfamiliar treasures, Susan Schulten offers us a fresh perspective on the American past. Here you can learn how medical men turned to maps in an urgent quest to solve the deadly mysteries of yellow fever and cholera. This stunning map owed much to its antebellum maps of geology as well as the fine chromolithography of Julius Bien. But readers will also find lesser-known maps made by soldiers on the front, Native American tribal leaders, and the first generation of girls to be publicly educated. Recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship for her research on the history of cartography, she lectures widely on the Civil War, the history of maps, and American history in general. Winner of the 2013 Hundley Award for History How Maps Became Modern Welcome! Note the inclusion of failed voyages and settlements. In the nineteenth century, Americans began to use maps in radically new ways.

Next

Mapping the Nation

mapping the nation schulten susan

Note that she marked not just the location of tribes, but their migration over time. States participating in each election are color coded by party voted. Visualizing Systems investigates how we map data to understand complex networks. In Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten portrays how the meaning of maps was transformed during the 19th Century. Mallet designed this complex map to guide the British as they developed cotton in India, drawing on existing geological and environmental maps from the era.

Next

Mapping the Nation

mapping the nation schulten susan

DuPont High School Red Clay School District The actual lessons that we participated in were fabulous. Contributor: Fran O'Malley Date Added: October 25, 2012 The Teaching American History grant represents an opportunity to learn how to be a better teacher. Here Charles Paullin represented advances in transportation technology in geographic terms in order to depict the qualitative changes over the course of American history. For more information on her newest book, visit www. A In the nineteenth century, Americans began to use maps in radically new ways. Maps were also used to understand and prevent epidemics, track weather patterns, analyze the demographics and psychographics of the south at the end of the Civil War, and much more. The book itself looks at the pivotal 19th century — when mapping expanded to include a diversity of human, social, cultural, political and environmental phenomena.

Next

Organization of American Historians: Susan Schulten

mapping the nation schulten susan

In this richly visual narrative, acclaimed historian Susan Schulten explores five centuries of American history through maps. There you will find hi-resolution digital copies of the maps she examines in the book and that we discuss in our interview. The map, from the is an early example of detailed urban social mapping, in this case motivated by strong anti-Chinese sentiment. The world we inhabit—saturated with maps and graphic information—grew out of this sea change in spatial thought and representation in the nineteenth century, when Americans learned to see themselves and their nation in new dimensions. Geography in the News: Book Release Susan Schulten, a self-proclaimed map enthusiast, author and history professor at the University of Denver, has recently published her second book, Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America, University of Chicago Press, July 6, 2012. The maps on this site reveal how this involved a fundamentally new way of thinking. Here you can trace the origin of historical atlases and timelines, and the spread of graphic illustrations of national history.

Next