Black majority wood peter. BLACK MAJORITY by Peter H. Wood 2019-01-25

Black majority wood peter Rating: 7,4/10 1870 reviews

( Peter H Wood ) Analytical Essay 22345

black majority wood peter

In black hawk down the main soldier… and Law and Order try to put a dramatic spin on many of the events surrounding the criminal justice system. In doing so it also opens up a description of white life, economics and farming, religion, relations with Native Americans, health, law and rebellion. A major issue Wood stresses from early on is the reliance of the white minority on the black majority. Wood highlights various examples of this deep-seated relationship. His efforts were worthwhile as he brought to light many aspects of the early colonial experience that did not exist and are surprisingly contradictory to the 19th century black experience and attitudes that tend to pervade modern thought about the condition of slaves.

Next

( Peter H Wood ) Analytical Essay 22345

black majority wood peter

Peter Wood's Black Majority is a social history examining the cause and effects, both explicit and implicit, of the black majority that emerged in colonial South Carolina. African immigrants, as Wood refers to them, struggled to communicate among English speakers. To demonstrate how immense the black majority was over the white minority, Woods uses a series of tables exhibiting slaves, males, females, children, number of slaver per household, and many other significant ratios of the early eighteenth century. Writing a book review is not to be confused with writing a summary of a book. Wood demonstrated that Africans from the Rice Coast brought the knowledge and technical skills to develop extensive cultivation that made one of the most lucrative industries in early America. Hence the fear and the extremism.

Next

Discussion of Black Majority: Negroes in South Carolina From 1670 to the Stono Rebellion by Peter Wood

black majority wood peter

Published in 1974, it was part of major revisions in the ways historians studied African-American history. With so many advantages over their white counterparts — numerical superiority and productive skills — why did Africans not enjoy a greater share of the fruits of their labors? However, African tradition is closely intertwined in North American History. To get at the lives of slaves, who keep no written records, he has to work in from man Wood's Black Majority describes the lives of blacks in colonial South Carolina including a chapter on language. Similar to many other colonies in the early stages of their development, South Carolina recognized a need for labor in light of considerable variables. Peter Wood explains why white planters in South Carolina sought African slave labor, how African slaves brought rice cultivation, immunity to malaria, and West African languages to America, and how increasing tensions between slaves and slave-owners culminated in the Stono Rebellion. File under: books that everyone interested in Colonial America needs to read.

Next

Peter H. Wood

black majority wood peter

The process of rice cultivation in the South Carolina settlement was extremely labor concentrated and exceptionally demanding on men. This has led to the modern conception of unskilled Africans from an backward continent that Wood and other scholars such as John Thornton - see Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800 have fought so hard to dispel. Twenty white Carolinians and forty-four of the slaves were killed before the rebellion was suppressed. Wood was one of the first historians to break into the mainstream with these discoveries, and today, this is well known information and as such hardly revelatory, though still interesting to read. File under: books that everyone interested in Colonial America needs to read.

Next

Book Review: Wood’s “Black Majority”

black majority wood peter

An increase in deaths upon their arrival, coupled with a need for provisions for survival, ultimately put a large emphasis on subsistence and the demand for adept cultivators. The revolt would end up being mostly unsuccessful as sixty of the slaves were either captured or executed and the effect on whites was kept to a minimal, in terms of deaths and property damage. African farmers in that region had been growing indigenous for thousands of years and were experts in cultivating the difficult crop. Whites knew that a revolt was likely to occur when they were all in one place and Sunday church services presented the best opportunity for a black revolt. Estimates show that roughly 40% of slaves reaching North America arrived at South Carolina, therefore it was natural for Wood to focus on this region in his research. He also discusses the drastic punitive measures taken by whites when they observed black defiance, in effort to maintain control. The first of these is the introduction of rice by African slaves.

Next

Peter H. Wood

black majority wood peter

The first part of the book focuses on the early years of the colony and the first colonists. The captured slaves were then decapetated and their heads were spiked on every mile post between that spot and Charles Town. Wood reveals how the quelling of this uprising represented a turning point for the turbulent first phase of Negro enslavement in the deep South. It is a central book to understanding the colonial south, its conclusions have become the accepted history and the basis for further investigations. Southern Spaces, 4 March 2011.

Next

Book Review: Wood’s “Black Majority”

black majority wood peter

Wood also demonstrated that in the earliest years of colonization there was more of a parity in labor and social relations than after the colony became better established and social divisions hardened. In a short amount of time Africans would develop into the clear majority in the region. Ta-Nehisi Coates demonstrates a letter writing format and introduce the thesis of this book with an interview. About Black Majority African slaves, if taken together, were the largest single group of non-English-speaking migrants to enter the North American colonies in the pre-Revolutionary era. This history presented by Peter Wood in Black Majority: Negroes in South Carolina from 1670 to the Stono Rebellion is not only unique because it focuses on one colony or state, but because the slave population of South Carolina existed under specific circumstances that allowed it to grow as a community apart from whites. In the final part of the book, Wood discusses the efforts that were made by colonial officials to codify the regulation of slave discipline on the plantation during the early eighteenth century. He demonstrates that the role of these early southerners was active, not passive: that their familiarity with rice culture made them an attractive, skilled labor force; that the sickle-cell trait may have been a positive influence in the warding-off of malaria, while a variety of acquired immunities served as protection from other diseases; that their African experiences enabled them to cope, often more effectively than Europeans, with the demands of the New World.

Next

Black Majority

black majority wood peter

Peter Hutchins Wood born 1943 in St. Until now the story of the Stono Rebellion has never been fully pieced together, and Mr. While that effectively ended the revolt, some of the rebels remained at large for days and weeks following the initial violence. Wood gravitated toward studying South Carolina not because it hadn't received any attention, but because it had a well over a 50% majority black population by 1776. Wood brings to life the experiences of the black majority in colonial South Carolina.

Next

BLACK MAJORITY by Peter H. Wood

black majority wood peter

The colonists also did not want to disturb trade relations. Black Majority: Negroes in South Carolina from 1670 to the Stono Rebellion is not a book one might normally pick up to read unless they had a keen interest in either the history of South Carolina or the Stono Rebellion or have been assigned a summary, analysis, or literature review , but this was a surprisingly engaging text. The book has dual main points that come together in the end with a massive uprising. This was a major step away from the old, racist idea that Africans were primitive people who didn't know anything before they were brought to America. Wood makes a very convincing argument that without Africans, South Carolina never would have gotten their rice industry their most important crop started. Not ironically as outnumbered whites began to assert social dominance over the majority population by putting in place increasing restrictions, they set an atmosphere ripe for rebellion.

Next

Peter H. Wood (Author of Black Majority)

black majority wood peter

This is a book I might recommend to a friend if they were conducting specialized study in African American or Southern history but it is almost too narrow for general consumption. One of Wood's main arguments here is that planters in South Carolina intentionally looked for and purchased slaves who already had knowledge and skills in rice cultivation from Africa, knowing that these slaves would bring that knowledge to S. Black Majority Summary Essay While the free essays can give you inspiration for writing, they cannot be used 'as is' because they will not meet your assignment's requirements. Yet it is often difficult to maintain the continual motivation needed to overcome the frequent obstacles and setbacks that litter the road to success. Grudem… acquiring that success requires hard work, perseverance, and dedication. Tracing the worsening of conditions for the black majority as the colony expanded, Mr.

Next